Tuesday, November 23, 2010

The Adipositivity Project Calendar (NSFW)

If you haven't heard of The Adipositivity Project by now you must be living under a rock. (Or leading a very interesting life where you don't spend oodles of time looking for entertainment online.) If you haven't heard of the project, here's the basic run down:
Adipose: Of or relating to fat.

Positivity: Characterized by or displaying acceptance or affirmation.

MISSION:The Adipositivity Project aims to promote size acceptance, not by listing the merits of big people, or detailing examples of excellence (these things are easily seen all around us), but rather, through a visual display of fat physicality. The sort that's normally unseen.

The hope is to widen definitions of physical beauty. Literally.

The photographs here are close details of the fat female form, without the inclusion of faces. One reason for this is to coax observers into imagining they're looking at the fat women in their own lives, ideally then accepting them as having aesthetic appeal which, for better or worse, often translates into more complete forms of acceptance.

The women you see in these images are educators, executives, mothers, musicians, professionals, performers, artists, activists, clerks, and writers. They are perhaps even the women you've clucked at on the subway, rolled your eyes at in the market, or joked about with your friends.

This is what they look like with their clothes off.

Some are showing you their bodies proudly. Others timidly. And some quite reluctantly. But they all share a determination in altering commonly accepted notions of a narrow and specific beauty ideal.
Pretty awesome right? Well, I was super excited to share with you guys the Adipositivity calendar today, but it turns out the calendar has been pulled by Cafepress. According to Adipositivity's facebook page, Cafepress said the calendar was pulled for the following reason: "We recently learned that your CafePress.com account contains material which may not be in compliance with our policies. Specifically, we prohibit the display or sale of products which may be sexually suggestive or... contain explicit sexual content (including full body nudity and genitalia)."


As dumb as that policy is, rules are rules I guess. But there's one slight problem, there's at least a few other calendars that definitely fit that criteria that are being sold with no apparent problem.


It makes you wonder what the real problem here is. Is it because fat people's bodies are being shown in a way that doesn't reduce them to the punch line of a joke? I don't want to ju7mp to conclusions, but I think Cafepress really dropped the ball here.

2 comments:

  1. Oh and I thought this quote was spot on but I had no idea where to put it:

    “The world is not full of Attractive People and Unattractive People. It’s full of people who are attractive to some and not to others. I hear from trolls all the time who complain that they don’t want to be “forced” to find nasty, ugly fat women attractive–which utterly baffles me, since the last thing I want to do is encourage fat-hating dicks to date fat women. You don’t find fat people attractive? Fabulous. Don’t date them. I will find a way to pick myself up and move on without your love. But to assume your lack of sexual interest in fat chicks must be universal–or that the mere existence of self-confident fat people having healthy relationships somehow “forces” you to find fat attractive–is the height of fucking narcissism.” Kate Harding

    http://kateharding.net/2008/03/29/in-which-i-ramble-about-attraction/

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